Youth Programs

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"Your school wide presentation to our fourth and fifth grade students on 'trees as habitat' was informative and beautifully presented. The slides and your interactive style complete with animal sounds engaged our 220 students for over an hour. That is not an easy thing to do!...Your talk was a wonderful combination of hard core scientific information and an eloquent explanation of the value of preserving untamed places."
--Daniel Ryan, Principal, Thomas Fleming School, Essex Junction, Vermont

The Natural Sciences Come Alive

It’s been shown that getting kids outdoors improves their memory, problem-solving and creativity, while bolstering their physical health as well. Keeping Track® can instill in kids a lifelong interest in the wonder of nature. Developed for students and teachers in grades 5-12, our educational programs present scientifically based classroom and field lessons that meet state and national standards. We also engage young learners in reflecting upon and appreciating why it is so important to conserve biodiversity throughout the world.

Keeping Track youth programs encourage students and teachers to think about our environment while exploring critical topics both in the classroom and in the field. Students learn how to:

  • Use authentic research skills to monitor the presence of animals
  • Study the relationship between healthy habitat and biodiversity
  • See how carnivores are an important measure of habitat health
  • Use signs of animals to learn about their behavior
  • Learn about the importance of protecting habitat for all wildlife.

Keeping Track offers a variety of options for schools, camps, church and scout groups and other youth organizations, among them:

  • Hands-on investigation of wildlife skulls, pelts, track castings and other exhibits
  • Slide shows illustrated with spectacular photographs by Sue Morse
  • One-half to full day, on-site, field workshops that cover track and sign identification, habitat features, and an introduction to using field skills to identify resident mammals.

A Keeping Track youth program will help young people develop a greater love for the natural world and become the stewards of tomorrow’s healthy habitats. Please contact us today to discuss how we can develop one to complement your curricula.

“We can see evidence that our Keeping Track wildlife programs are truly inspiring many of our students and faculty, as well as community volunteers who have participated in the Keeping Track wildlife monitoring course.  We look forward to building more trained volunteers, so as to be even better prepared to implement the appropriate conservation planning needs in our region."
--Matt Schlein, Director, Willowell Foundation

"As an educator focused on educating for sustainability, I had heard Sue Morse’s name long before I had the opportunity to learn from her in the field....Not only does Sue model excitement and love of place, but she surrounds herself with a wonderful staff of volunteers and interns who are highly capable and enthusiastic....During one of my outings at Wolf Run, while working with area students, educators, and conservationists gathered by the Champlain Basin Education Initiative, I observed Sue completely transform a young woman’s experience. One of the participants, a local middle-school student, was overcome by cold, frustration, and anxiety part way through the trip. This young person became so exacerbated that she sat down in the snow refusing to move forward. With help from Sue and her interns, not only did this student ultimately rejoin the group, but after an hour (having enjoyed Sue’s homemade chicken noodle soup, and added another jacket and pair of socks provided by Keeping Track) she was laughing, running, and following right in Sue’s footsteps. It was Sue’s professionalism and attention to the needs of each participant in the group that allowed the day to continue forward smoothly and successfully.
-- Christie Nold, School Programs Coordinator, Shelburne Farms, Shelburne, Vt.

"As an educator focused on educating for sustainability, I had heard Sue Morse’s name long before I had the opportunity to learn from her in the field. My first opportunity to work with Sue and Keeping Track was in the planning process of a tracking day sponsored by the Champlain Basin Education Initiative. In preparation for our time together, Sue invited me to get a feel for Wolf Run by joining with another group.

This fall I ‘tagged along’ as Sue worked with students from the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. After my first outing, I was thoroughly hooked! Sue has the ability to meet each person at their edge – to bring people to a new level of understanding and connection to their place in the natural world. Not only does Sue model excitement and love of place, but she surrounds herself with a wonderful staff of volunteers and interns who are highly capable and enthusiastic.

During one of my outings at Wolf Run, while working with area students, educators, and conservationists gathered by the Champlain Basin Education Initiative, I observed Sue completely transform a young woman’s experience. One of the participants, a local middle-school student, was overcome by cold, frustration, and anxiety part way through the trip. This young person became so exacerbated that she sat down in the snow refusing to move forward. With help from Sue and her interns, not only did this student ultimately rejoin the group, but after an hour (having enjoyed Sue’s homemade chicken noodle soup, and added another jacket and pair of socks provided by Keeping Track) she was laughing, running, and following right in Sue’s footsteps. It was Sue’s professionalism and attention to the needs of each participant in the group that allowed the day to continue forward smoothly and successfully.

Above all, what I’ve taken away from my experiences with Sue and Keeping Track is a deep love and appreciation for the land and conservation efforts. In addition, I feel a deeper respect and understanding of all Vermont’s inhabitants!"
-- Christie Nold
School Programs Coordinator, Shelburne Farms, Shelburne, Vt.